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collegecruiser09
05-15-2006, 06:37 AM
Does anyone out there own a sportster 883? If so do you had any complaints about the bike's performance since you have owned it? I am interested in buying one and was curious. Any advice would be helpful

nidan
05-15-2006, 09:35 AM
My wife had one for 2 years, and has since traded on a 1200C.

I rode it a number of times and even though my bike has twice the power , still had a good time.

With a Stage I kit on them the little sporties are a good , nimble and entertaining ride. I'd recommend getting the newer ones with the rubber mounted engines (04 and later) you can always take the motor up to 1200-1250 if you want more go.

collegecruiser09
05-15-2006, 11:23 AM
thanks, I've heard that they can develop heavy vibrations at cruising speeds. has anyone experienced this?

FX
05-15-2006, 11:40 AM
Define cruising speed. Cause people tend to talk out their asses with such subjective statements when they tell other folks such things. Sometimes you will find they never even rode that type bike, yet they repeat a sound bite like some expert later if the suject comes up and they heard a comment in a crowd once.

I don't know anyone that compains about sporty vibration. Hell, I rode an iron head, it vibrated a bit, but that was up around 85 mph and not unbareable.

bufordtpisser
05-15-2006, 12:20 PM
Define cruising speed. Cause people tend to talk out their asses with such subjective statements when they tell other folks such things. Sometimes you will find they never even rode that type bike, yet they repeat a sound bite like some expert later if the suject comes up and they heard a comment in a crowd once.

I don't know anyone that compains about sporty vibration. Hell, I rode an iron head, it vibrated a bit, but that was up around 85 mph and not unbareable.

I had a 77 Ironhead sporty for 13 years. The guy who's wife I bought it from sent it in for some upgrade work,(Cams, Ported heads, exhaust) and a custom paint job. He died before he even had a chance to ride it after the upgrades. She sold it to me for $2800.00, and it only had 2000 miles on it. I rode the hell out of that bike, and even being solid mounted it only had a little buzz in the bars at around 80 - 85 MPH. I put a set of foam rubber grips on it, and never looked back. It pulled 79 HP on the dyno. Nice bike, wish I would have kept it.

I have ridden on a couple of 883's. They were all nice bikes. Light and nimble compared to the Ultra. A little anemic in the power department, but easily upgradable. They are nice bikes for short to medium crusing and pub hopping, but I would want something a bit bigger for long distance riding. I believe that they have a good service reputation. Get used to the fact that some idiots out there will tell you that you are driving a girls bike. Don't listen to them, drive what you like, and like what you drive. And by all means be safe.

JFN
05-16-2006, 05:12 AM
We have a 97 1200 Sporty. I buy loctite by the 50 gallon drum to try to keep parts from vibrating off. :)
I never did find the foot peg that vibrated off when the wife was riding it.
On the plus side the bike is a ball to ride. It's fast and nimble plus the wife seems to like the vibration. :)

FX
05-16-2006, 11:38 AM
Oh yeah, I carried tools and had to tighten stuff often.

collegecruiser09
05-16-2006, 11:39 AM
the previous comment from JFN is one i have seen before....
Bad vibrations causing the bike to feel uncomfertable or fall apart. But form the posts before it i am more inclined to think that this is not usually the case. Thanks for the info guys. when i said cruising speeds i meant between 60 and 75 miles/ hour. or at the higher rpm's of any gear.

Dgrason
05-16-2006, 08:48 PM
The vibration story is something that you hear most often from guys who don't ride Harleys. You hear it all the time from the metric boys. The other day I went with a friend cause he's interested in Suzuki's new M109R. I haven't been in any dealer other than a Harley dealer in forever. But I went with him to look and see what this Zuki was all about. I think it's a cool bike BTW. But the salesman did a real number on Harleys while he was extolling the virtues of this Zuki. He talked about how they (Harleys) were anemic, overpriced, unreliable, didn't keep up with the industry's technological advances and most of all, he went on and on about vibration. He went on and on about Huyabusa technology going into the M109R giving it the ability to beat Harleys at will, anytime anyplace. These morons must be taught to say these things and then people who buy the metrics think they really made a great choice when they avoid those damn Harleys. It's all a bunch of snake oil that fast talking flimflam men are using to sell their product. This is one HUGE reason why there's so much trash talking going on between bikers of different brands. It takes ZERO intelligence to rundown someone else's bike.

Personally, I was really impressed with the M109R. If the salesman would concentrate on the virtues of that particular bike, I'd be way more inclined to buy it. But guys just can't seem to resist slicing and dicing other company's products when there's no one standing in the showroom to offer a rebuttal. As a result, I don't know that I'll EVER buy a Suzuki. .....definately NOT from that dealership.

Dgrason
05-16-2006, 09:10 PM
Does anyone out there own a sportster 883? If so do you had any complaints about the bike's performance since you have owned it? I am interested in buying one and was curious. Any advice would be helpful

If this is your very first street bike, ask yourself this question. Are you buying a Harley because it's a Harley? I mean, is the name itself swaying your decision?

I usually tell most folks that have never ridden street to buy something along the lines of a Honda VTX1300 or Shadow Ace. The Harley 883 sells for about the same price as a VTX1300. But to the uninitiated, the Honda actually offers more value for the money unless you're specifically looking to buy your first HARLEY! And YES, the VTX1300 is a faster bike. But unless someone is a real Harley enthusiast, chances are they'll regret buying the Harley when that money could have bought something smoother, faster, cheaper, yada, yada. That's why I tell folks to get a metric. Once you become an experienced rider and start seeing the motorcycle world in deeper terms, the Harleys start looking different, meaning better and better.

But we Harley guys buy Harleys because Harley-Davidson is a company with over 100 years of motorcycling tradition. HD has built beautiful bikes from the very beginning. Brand new bikes look very similar to bikes that are 60 years old. And just like leather jackets, Harleys never go out of style. My Electra-Glide is 18 years old. But put it next to a 2006 model and it would take a trained eye to spot the differences. That's because the bike was great in 1988 the same as the new ones are great right now. My brother has a 1978 shovelhead. It was built when Honda was killing the motorcycling industry with its CB750. The Honda had 4 cylinders, overhead cam, triple discs, electric start, and sold for a little over half the price of the shovelhead. My bro's shovel has a 4 speed, pushrods, and is huge in physical size compared to the metric offerings of the day. But anywhere he goes, that bike never fails to draw a crowd wherever he parks it. Folks LOVE the old ways.

No other company has its finger on the pulse of what its customers want better than Harley-Davidson. No other brand of motorcycle enjoys the AMAZING aftermarket support that HD has. Harley riders are guys that love tradition. We see no need to change body styles every couple of years. We see no reason to be the fastest guy on the block only to have next year's bikes beat us. Who cares?!

No other bike lends itself to customization as a Harley. Go to any Harley show and you'll see that every bike there started as a clean slate for the owner to express himself like no other bike owner can.

when you start taking all these things into consideration, NOW you start seeing the value in buying your first Harley. Now, as far as the vibration thing, just remember the credo my brother and I live by:

"It's a Harley dammit! Learn to Love it!"

JFN
05-16-2006, 09:17 PM
The vibration story is something that you hear most often from guys who don't ride Harleys. .
I not sure what your getting at here Dgrason. The 97 Sporty will shake the fillings out of your teeth. It was my wife's first bike and we keep it because it's fun to ride but please don't insinuate that the older Sportys don't vibrate.
There was a definite reason that Harley switched to the rubber mounted engines.

Dgrason
05-16-2006, 09:37 PM
I never said that they didn't vibrate. But someone ealier said that many folks repeat this having never actually ridden a Sporty for themselves. What I said was the I MOST OFTEN HEAR THIS from guys who don't ride Harleys and this is true. This characteristic is bandied around in some circles way too much. Each person needs to ride for himself and make his own decision.

Also, it may be that the vibration does vary from bike to bike. I've ridden many Sportys in my time and never had one that I would consider objectionable. For certain, they DID vibrate. Hell my E-Glide vibrates. So does my wife's Nissan Maxima. If it means a lot then simply take any bike for a test ride and decide. Only then can one know if it's going to be acceptable or not.

bufordtpisser
05-16-2006, 10:35 PM
We have a 97 1200 Sporty. I buy loctite by the 50 gallon drum to try to keep parts from vibrating off. :)
I never did find the foot peg that vibrated off when the wife was riding it.
On the plus side the bike is a ball to ride. It's fast and nimble plus the wife seems to like the vibration. :)

Although I will not tell you that my bike did not vibrate, I will tell you that it was never to the point of being objectionable. Never once did I lose a part due to vibration with maybe the exception of a tail light bulb. Did I have to tighten things from time to time, hell yes, but i have used loctite for years and never lost a part. But then again, I use loctite on all my bikes.


All I can say is ride it, and if you like it, buy it.

collegecruiser09
05-17-2006, 11:12 AM
I have been looking for my first bike for a little over 4 months now and have progressed through many of the brands. Bikes I have considered are the Honda shadow spirt or deluxe, the kawasaki vulcan 500, suzuki bulevard M50, a Triumph (simply becasue my dad just bought one), the new Vento and now the Harley. I haven't decided on a bike yet and still haven't taken the MSF course. I hope to do both this summer or fall if possible.

As far as vibration goes in Harleys I have no problem with it I just wanted to make sure I knew what I was getting myself into. Being in college I don't have a whole lot of money so that might be the ultimate deciding factor.

Does any one have any feed back on any of the other bikes as far as up keep, power, or handling goes. The bike will just be used for traveling to and from school or work and maybe a little two up riding.

Thanks

bufordtpisser
05-17-2006, 11:54 AM
I have been looking for my first bike for a little over 4 months now and have progressed through many of the brands. Bikes I have considered are the Honda shadow spirt or deluxe, the kawasaki vulcan 500, suzuki bulevard M50, a Triumph (simply becasue my dad just bought one), the new Vento and now the Harley. I haven't decided on a bike yet and still haven't taken the MSF course. I hope to do both this summer or fall if possible.

As far as vibration goes in Harleys I have no problem with it I just wanted to make sure I knew what I was getting myself into. Being in college I don't have a whole lot of money so that might be the ultimate deciding factor.

Does any one have any feed back on any of the other bikes as far as up keep, power, or handling goes. The bike will just be used for traveling to and from school or work and maybe a little two up riding.

Thanks

The best thing that you can do is read all of the reviews that you can possibly find on all of your choices. You look like you are leaning towards some really nice bikes, I have not personally owned any of them except a sportster, but have also not heard any horror stories about them either. One other factor that you may want to consider is the resale value. Even though you are gung ho about riding now, you may cool off to riding, or decide that it is just not for you. You may also need to at some time in the future have to think about selling the bike due to family obligations. I believe that you will find that the Harley will hold it's resale value much better than your other choices.

collegecruiser09
05-17-2006, 04:14 PM
Thanks